Sarah A. Cordes

Sarah A. Cordes, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
Policy, Organizational, & Leadership Studies
Ritter Annex, 228
1301 Cecil B. Moore Ave.
Philadelphia, PA 19122
phone: 215-204-6332
sarah.cordes@temple.edu 
Education
  • Ph.D., Public Policy, NYU Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Servicea
  • M.P.P., Duke University, Sanford School of Public Policy, Concentration in Social Policy
  • BA, The College of William and Mary, History
Areas of Interest
  • Education policy
  • Economics of education,
  • Urban policy,
  • Labor economics,
  • Quantitative methods.
Recent Scholarship
PUBLICATIONS
 

Sarah A. Cordes. (Forthcoming). “In Pursuit of the Common Good: The Spillover Effects of Charter Schools on Public School Students in New York City.” Education Finance and Policy.

Sarah A. Cordes. (2018). “Charters and the Common Good: The Spillover Effects of Charter schools in New York City.” Education Next

Amy Ellen Schwartz, Leanna Stiefel, and Sarah A. Cordes. (2017) “Moving Matters: The Causal Effect of School Mobility in Student Performance.” Education Finance and Policy.

Sean P. Corcoran and Sarah A. Cordes. (2017) “The Economics of School Choice.” In The Handbook of School Choice, ed. Robert Fox and Nina Buchanan, Wiley Blackwell

Sarah A. Cordes, Amy Ellen Schwartz, Leanna Stiefel, and Jeffrey E. Zabel. (2015), “Is Neighborhood Destiny? Exploring the Link between Neighborhood Mobility and Student Outcomes” Urban Studies.

Sean P. Corcoran, Sarah A. Cordes, and Amy Ellen Schwartz. (2014) “State Education Expenditures.” In Sustaining the States: The Fiscal Viability of American State Governments, ed. Marilyn Rubin and Katherine Willoughby, CRC Press.

Leanna Stiefel and Sarah A. Cordes. (2014) “Measuring School Finance Equity Using School Finance Statistics.” In Encyclopedia of Education Economics and Finance, ed. Dominic J. Brewer and Lawrence O. Picus, SAGE Publications, Inc.

Sarah A. Cordes, Amy Ellen Schwartz, and Leanna Stiefel. “The Effect of Residential Mobility on Student Performance: Evidence from New York City.” Under review, American Educational Research Journal.