Annual School Psychology, Counseling Psychology and Applied Behavior Analysis Conference 
March 25-26, 2022

Hosted virtually via Zoom

Schedule of Events

Friday, March 25, 2022

 

Session 1: 9:00-11:00 AM

  • Theodore Burnes, PhD, MSEd, LPCC, HSPP – Supervision in the Key of COVID: Clinician Training with New Music

​​* Session 1 is available to psychologists, professional counselors, social workers, and marriage and family therapists for CE credit. It also meets ACT 48 Continuing Professional Education Requirements as mandated by the Pennsylvania Department of Education.

Session 2: 11:00-1:00 PM

  • Angelina Nortey, PhD – Applying DisCrit to Exclusionary Discipline
  • Garrett Roberts, PhD BCBA-D – Engaging Learners in Small Group Academic Instruction with a Step-by-Step Behavior Support Program

​* All Session 2 presentations are available to psychologists, professional counselors, social workers, and marriage and family therapists for CE credit. It also meets ACT 48 Continuing Professional Education Requirements as mandated by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. The session presented by Dr. Roberts is available for 2.0 Type 2 BCBA CEUs per the Behavior Analyst Certification Board requirements. The Temple University Department of Psychological Studies in Education is a BACB Approved Continuing Education provider (ACE Provider Number: OP-22-0333).

1:00-1:20 PM

  • Lunch/Posters

Session 3: 1:30-3:30 PM

  • Sam Song, PhD – No Longer Optional: Culturally Responsible Mental Health in Schools
  • Tara Raines, PhD – Rupturing the School-based Pathways to Juvenile Justice: Considerations for School-based Professionals

​* All Session 3 presentations are available to psychologists, professional counselors, social workers, and marriage and family therapists for CE credit. It also meets ACT 48 Continuing Professional Education Requirements as mandated by the Pennsylvania Department of Education.

KEYNOTE: 3:30-5:30 PM

Trans Liberation is for Everybody: Moving from Affirmation to Liberation for All Genders
Anneliese Singh, PhD, LPC (she/they)

In this workshop, Singh describes how trans-negative sociopolitical discourses further trans-antagonism and re-ignite community-based trauma for trans and nonbinary people. Using historical context and histories of trans liberation and civil rights movements around the world, Singh explores how divided discussions about trans people and bathrooms have the potential to move all of us towards learning more about our own gender training and other socializations around race/ethnicity, disability, class, and other identities. Applying liberation psychology tenets to trans counseling approaches, Singh invites attendees to dream up, envision, and bring into the world gender freedom practices in order to provide a more empowering counseling environment for people from all gender identities and expressions.

* This program is available to psychologists, professional counselors, social workers, and marriage and family therapists for CE credit. It also meets ACT 48 Continuing Professional Education Requirements as mandated by the Pennsylvania Department of Education.

​Saturday, March 26, 2022

Session 4: 8:30-10:20 AM

  • Mary O'Leary Wiley, PhD, ABPP – Adoption Complexities in Children and Adults in the 21st Century
  • Leslee Frye, MS, EdS – Filling your Cup: Prioritizing Self-compassion, Self-gratitude and Wellbeing in Schools

​* All Session 4 presentations are available to psychologists, professional counselors, social workers, and marriage and family therapists for CE credit. It also meets ACT 48 Continuing Professional Education Requirements as mandated by the Pennsylvania Department of Education.

Session 5: 10:30-12:20 PM

  • Elizabeth (Liz) Power, EdD – Executive Function Assessment in School-Based Settings
  • Chelsea Quick, PhD, NCSP, BCBA-D – Development of Social Skills through Play Groups

​* All Session 5 presentations are available to psychologists, professional counselors, social workers, and marriage and family therapists for CE credit. It also meets ACT 48 Continuing Professional Education Requirements as mandated by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. The session presented by Dr. Quick is available for 2.0 Type 2 BCBA CEUs per the Behavior Analyst Certification Board requirements. The Temple University Department of Psychological Studies in Education is a BACB Approved Continuing Education provider (ACE Provider Number: OP-22-0333).

12:20-1:00 PM

  • Lunch/Posters

Session 6: 1:00-4:00 PM

  • Franci Crepeau-Hobson, PhD, NCSP, LP – Suicide Risk and Threat Assessments: Ethical and Legal Considerations

​* Session 6 is available to psychologists, professional counselors, social workers, and marriage and family therapists for CE credit and fulfills the PA Ethics CE requirement. It also meets ACT 48 Continuing Professional Education Requirements as mandated by the Pennsylvania Department of Education.

Detailed Schedule of Events

Friday, March 25, 2022

Session 1: 9:00-11:00 AM

Supervision in the Key of COVID: Clinician Training with New Music
Theodore Burnes, PhD, MSEd, LPCC, HSPP (he/him)
Antioch University

The purpose of this two-hour workshop is to provide attendees with contemporary understandings of how the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the supervision process and outcomes for pre-licensed professionals. The facilitator will synthesize trauma-informed, sex-positive models of supervision with self-reflection and literature rooted in best practices to help attendees increase resilience and supervisee empowerment in their work.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify at least two innovative theoretical frameworks that have emerged in their own supervision sessions (as supervisors or supervisees) during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Demonstrate and evaluate at least one supervisory intervention that is both sex-positive and trauma-informed.
  • Utilize empowerment into at least two facets of their supervision practice.

Session 2: 11:00-1:00 PM

Applying DisCrit to Exclusionary Discipline
Angelina Nortey, PhD (she/her)
Sage Wellness & Consulting/Yeshiva University

The purpose of this workshop is to draw the connections between Disability Studies and Critical Race Theory (DisCrit) to disciplinary disproportionality. Trends in school discipline and special education legislation will be analyzed. Emphasis will be placed on Black students identified with disabilities. Case examples will be used to illustrate how two Black women special education teachers minimally used exclusionary practices. Implications for practice in school settings will be provided.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will identify the main tenets of DisCrit.
  • Participants will analyze the current data on school discipline.
  • Participants will identify the relevance of DisCrit to disciplinary disproportionality.
  • Participants will identify practices consistent with DisCrit to alleviate exclusionary discipline practices.

Engaging Learners in Small Group Academic Instruction with a Step-by-Step Behavior Support Program
Garrett Roberts, PhD BCBA-D (he/him)
University of Denver

Dr. Roberts will describe a program titled, Engaged Learners, which is a set of strategies and practices, designed to be embedded into Tier 2 reading instruction to improve student engagement for elementary students with co-occurring reading and behavior difficulties.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to list and describe three high impact instructional strategies to improve student engagement during Tier 2 reading instruction. 
  • Participants will be able to list and describe four high impact behavior management practices to improve student engagement during Tier 2 reading instruction.
  • Participants will be able to describe and demonstrate how to implement Engaged Learners, a program with three high impact instructional strategies and four high impact behavior management practices that can be embedded into Tier 2 reading instruction.

1:00-1:30 PM

  • Lunch/Posters

Session 3: 1:30-3:30 PM

No Longer Optional: Culturally Responsible Mental Health in Schools
Sam Song, PhD (he/him/his/they)
University of Nevada Las Vegas

The nation continues to be in a youth mental health crisis for more than 20 years now (U. S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2000). School mental health is part of the solution; however, that too appears to have fallen short given. School psychologists can lead schools into delivering more effective mental health services that are equitable for all children and youth. However, a new model is needed to guide practice, research, and policy -- the culturally responsible dual-factor mental health framework (Lazarus, Doll, Song, & Radliff, 2021). The purpose of this session is to introduce this framework, explain what it means for school psychology, and discuss strategies to be implemented by school psychologists. One of the advantages of this session will be its facilitation of self-understanding and professional growth in cultural humility and cultural competency. This session will rely on engaging instructional approaches including discussion, case examples, collaborative learning, games, and brief lectures.

Learning Objectives:

  • After attending this session, participants will identify the culturally responsible dual-factor mental health framework.
  • After attending this session, participants will compare the assumptions of the culturally responsible dual-factor mental health framework with a traditional framework.
  • After attending this session, participants will identify strategies to be used in schools to promote culturally responsible mental health.

Rupturing the School-based Pathways to Juvenile Justice: Considerations for School-based Professionals
Tara Raines, PhD (she/they)
University of Nevada Las Vegas

The purpose of this presentation is to orient participants to school-based practices that move students toward the carceral continuum.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learners will describe the carceral continuum.
  • Learners will list three practices in early childhood that contribute to the carceral continuum.
  • Learners will utilize three advocacy tools to reduce school influence on the carceral continuum.

KEYNOTE: 3:30-5:30 PM

Trans Liberation is for Everybody: Moving from Affirmation to Liberation for All Genders
Anneliese Singh, PhD, LPC (she/they)
Tulane University

In this workshop, Singh describes how trans-negative sociopolitical discourses further trans-antagonism and re-ignite community-based trauma for trans and nonbinary people. Using historical context and histories of trans liberation and civil rights movements around the world, Singh explores how divided discussions about trans people and bathrooms have the potential to move all of us towards learning more about our own gender training and other socializations around race/ethnicity, disability, class, and other identities. Applying liberation psychology tenets to trans counseling approaches, Singh invites attendees to dream up, envision, and bring into the world gender freedom practices in order to provide a more empowering counseling environment for people from all gender identities and expressions.

Learning Objectives:

Attendees will be able to:

  • Describe three components of trans and nonbinary (TNB)-affirming counseling and psychological practice.
  • Describe three components of trans and nonbinary (TNB)-liberatory counseling and psychological practice.
  • Identify at least three advocacy actions mental health professionals can engage in to counter anti-TNB bias, discrimination, and cisgender supremacy

Saturday, March 26, 2022

Session 4: 8:30-10:20 AM

Adoption Complexities in Children and Adults in the 21st Century
Mary O'Leary Wiley, PhD, ABPP (she/her)
Private Practice

This workshop will provide an overview of the primary issues that are relevant to clinical work with adopted children and adults, as well as their birth families and their adoptive families, collectively known as the adoption constellation. Issues that arise in foster families, multicultural adoptive families, and other diverse families will be discussed. Case studies will be presented with opportunities for discussion.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • Compare and contrast three differences between the adoption process historically and in the current climate.
  • List at least two issues faced by adopted children and adults.
  • Describe at least two issues faced by the adoptive family.
  • Describe at least two issues faced by birth families.
  • Explain how attachment is central to competency-based adoption practices.
  • Identify two strategies or resources that promote successful navigation of the adoption constellation.

Filling your Cup: Prioritizing Self-compassion, Self-gratitude and Wellbeing in Schools
Leslee Frye, MS, EdS (she/her)
SCH Academy

Before the pandemic, wellness in the United States was already an important topic garnering a lot of attention. Since the onset of the pandemic, the issue has become even more vital as individuals cope with anxiety, depression, loneliness, and other mental health struggles in a very trying time. In this interactive session, you will walk away with research-based practices from the fields of Mindfulness, Social Emotional Learning and Positive Psychology that you can utilize with yourselves, your teams, and your students to reduce stress and anxiety, improve attention and performance, and strengthen overall physical and psychological well-being. This learning session provides an easy framework to give professionals the understanding, motivation, and practices needed to work on becoming better practitioners, better leaders and better selves.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will identify one's personal wellbeing and why it is so important to be their best possible selves – for their students, their colleagues, their school organizations and most importantly themselves.
  • Participants will identify the science of wellness and human behavior.
  • Participants will identify the roles that belonging and social connection, a sense of purpose, self-compassion, mindfulness, gratitude and appreciation.
  • Participants will be able to demonstrate research-based strategies and practices that they can replicate immediately in their personal and professional lives to boost wellbeing and resilience as well as engagement and performance.

Session 5: 10:30-12:20 PM

Executive Function Assessment in School-Based Settings 
Elizabeth (Liz) Power, EdD (she/her)
College of St. Rose

During the presentation, Dr. Power will provide an overview of executive functions, related neuropsychological assessments, and implications for executive function deficits in the school setting.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will identify which formal and informal executive function assessments they can use in their own practice.
  • Participants will analyze real-world case studies from individuals in grades K-12 with executive function deficits.
  • Participants will identify various executive function deficits and their implications for the K-12 school setting.

Development of Social Skills through Play Groups
Chelsea Quick, PhD, NCSP, BCBA-D (she/her)
Aurora Public Schools

During this presentation, participants will learn how to foster client/student social skill development through play groups. Guidelines (e.g., planning for generalization) and techniques (e.g., least to most prompting) for play group facilitators will be discussed and modeled. An example play group structure designed to maximize opportunities for social skill practice and ease of data collection will be provided. Visuals and additional resources, such as an activity list for various social skill areas, will be provided to attendees. Attendees will explore how ideas presented compare to current practices in their applied settings, so they can critically engage their colleagues in discussions of social skill development for students of all ages.

Learning Objectives:

Participants will:

  • Describe two techniques to foster client/student social skill development through play groups.
  • Demonstrate how to structure play group sessions to maximize opportunities for social skill practice and ease of data collection.
  • Be able to list at least three activity ideas to use during play groups to develop a specific social skill.

12:20-1:00 PM

  • Lunch/Posters

Session 6: 1:00-4:00 PM

Suicide Risk and Threat Assessments: Ethical and Legal Consideration
Franci Crepeau-Hobson, PhD, NCSP, LP (she/hers)
University of Colorado Denver

Given training and expertise in school and client safety, children's mental health, crisis prevention and intervention, and educational and mental health law, school and counseling psychologists are critical members of suicide risk and threat assessment teams. In the course of conducting these safety-related assessments, mental health professionals may encounter ethical dilemmas that result from the challenges of working within systems and on multidisciplinary teams. This session will provide a brief overview of best practices in suicide risk and threat assessments, relevant ethical standards, and legal requirements, with an emphasis on school-based practice. Additionally, the session will include potential ethical dilemmas associated with conducting these safety assessments, and how the use of a socially responsive ethical decision-making model might be applied to ethical challenges that might arise.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the goals and process of threat assessment.
  • Identify best practices in school-based suicide prevention and intervention.
  • Utilize the legal issues related to threat assessment in the school setting.
  • List FERPA requirements in the context of school safety and threat assessments.
  • Identify the safety-related statutes in Pennsylvania, including Duty to Warn/Protect.
  • Identify the legal implications of suicidal risk.
  • Identify relevant safety-related ethical standards.
  • Describe one commonly used ethical problem-solving model in the context of suicide risk and threat assessment.

Please note: The three hours of this presentation fulfills the Ethics training requirement for psychologists.

Please note: The keynote, sessions one, two three, four, five, and six are available for CE credit for psychologists.